Reply to this post in at least 125 words or more.A series of

Reply to this post in at least 125 words or more.A series of vital shifts in power and/or change occur over a period of time is commonly referred to as a revolution. The course text, Science & culture throughout history, explains that while the meaning of “revolution” as it pertains to science remains debatable, the Scientific Revolution is easily definable (Bowles & Kaplan, 2012). Over the course of 200 years (between 1500 and 1700) there were many remarkable scientific changes that occurred; these scientific changes were profound and distinct to the Scientific Revolution (Bowles & Kaplan, 2012). Philosopher Thomas Kuhn argued the notion of cumulative science as he felt as there was no clear line of trackable progress from Aristotle to Newton (Bowles & Kaplan, 2012). Kuhn’s priority was explaining how a scientific revolution occurs; ultimately outlining the process as a series of stages. The stages included pre-paradigm (competing ideas are considered), paradigm (ideas take hold and dominate), normal science (minuscule investigations), paradigm change (discovery and crisis), and -as a result of the previous stages- scientific revolution (noncumulative scientific development in which an older paradigm is replaced by a new one resulting in a new worldview) (Bowles & Kaplan, 2012). As suggested by the prompt, Steven Shapin’s opening sentence in The Scientific Revolution (2008), “There was no such thing as the Scientific Revolution, and this is a book about it” (Introduction, p.1), is not only a bold opening but a bold contest to Kuhn’s model which included the stages listed above. What Shapin is saying with this opening and over again throughout the course of the writing is that Kuhn’s approach was incorrect and illogical based on slew of unrecognized errors and bias (Shapin, 2008). Bowles, M. & Kaplan, B. (2012). Science & culture throughout history. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc. Retrieved from www.ashfordeducation.com.Shapin, S. (2008). Introduction. In The Scientific Revolution (2008). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. Retrieved from http://www.monoskop.org/images/1/13/Shapin_Steven_…